AJN’s December Issue: Staffing Issues, Wandering in Dementia, Type 2 Diabetes Meds, More

AJN’s December issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss, including two continuing education (CE) articles, which you can access for free.

Data from the Military Nursing Outcomes Database project demonstrate that inadequately staffed shifts can increase the likelihood of adverse events. But what does this mean for the average nurse on a shift? In “Staffing Matters—Every Shift,” the authors present common dilemmas hospitals face in nurse staffing, illustrating the potential hazards for patients and nurses alike. This CE article is open access and can earn you 2.1 CE credits.

People with dementia are at risk for both missing incidents and wandering. In “Missing Incidents in Community-Dwelling People with Dementia,” the authors differentiate between these two risks, describe personal characteristics that may influence the outcomes in missing incidents, and suggest strategies for preventing and responding to missing incidents. This CE article is open access and can earn you 2.1 CE credits. For more information, listen to a podcast with the authors.

There is a growing consensus that primary care providers can better address patients’ needs by using different models of care, such as the patient-centered medical home. “The Patient-Centered Medical Home” discusses the guiding principles of this model, nurse care coordination, reimbursement and implementation, cost-effectiveness and quality improvement, and the need for greater nurse advocacy.

Being unaware of the realities of licensure can damage a nurse’s career, even permanently. “Professional License Protection Strategies,” the third and final article in a three-part series on nursing boards’ disciplinary actions, discusses strategies for protecting one’s nursing license.

Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes and over a quarter of these are unaware of their condition. “Recent Safety Updates on Type 2 Diabetes Medications” offers providers an overview of current treatments, as well as their risks and benefits to help when deciding on drug therapy for specific patients.

And for an exploration of how bias in health care affects transgender patients, read “The Ethical Nursing Care of Transgender Patients.”

There is plenty more in this issue, so stop by and have a look. Feel free to tell us what you think on Facebook or our blog.

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2016-11-21T13:08:50+00:00 November 30th, 2012|Nursing|0 Comments

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Managing editor, American Journal of Nursing

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