AJN’s April Issue: Sickle Cell Anemia, Telehealth, Systematic Reviews, FOAMed, More

AJN0414.Cover.OnlineAJN‘s April issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss, including two continuing education (CE) articles that you can access for free.

Coping with pain in sickle cell anemia. Our April cover features a painting of red flowers in a vase. But on closer inspection, you might notice that the flowers are actually red blood cells, painted by a young girl who suffers from sickle cell anemia. Afflicting about 90,000 to 100,000 people in the United States, sickle cell disease often causes acute and chronic pain syndromes described as being on par with cancer-related pain. Cognitive behavioral therapies, such as the use of guided imagery, have shown promise in changing pain perception and coping patterns in people with chronic illnesses. April’s original research CE article, “Using Guided Imagery to Manage Pain in Young Children with Sickle Cell Disease,” suggests that this technique can be effective for managing pain in school-age children with the disease.

Implementing advances in telehealth. New technologies such as remote monitoring and videoconferencing often emerge before a facility is ready to efficiently integrate them. Sometimes referred to as disruptive innovations, these technologies, while convenient and easy to use, may not be readily accepted. “Telehealth: A Case Study in Disruptive Innovation” discusses the many applications of telehealth, a means of delivering care that is likely to be a part of every nurse’s skill set. If you’re reading AJN on your iPad, you can listen to a podcast interview with the author by tapping on the podcast icon on the first page. The podcast is also available on our Web site.

New installment on systematic reviews. Last month, we debuted our new series from the Joanna Briggs Institute on the systematic review. This second installment, “Developing the Review Question and Inclusion Criteria,” provides an overview of the first steps taken when conducting such a review, starting with forming the perfect review question.

#FOAMed. The April iNurse column, “Have You FOAMed?” delves into the new and still evolving social media concept called FOAM, or Free Open Access Meducation. FOAM is an umbrella concept that refers to online media that students and professionals can use to educate themselves and to share and discuss new knowledge and ideas. It spans many social media platforms and is a fast, free way to keep up with the latest in medical knowledge.

Nurses on the front line. This month’s AJN Reports revisits the Boston Marathon bombings one year later. Four nurses on duty that day from four different hospitals in Boston tell their stories of providing care during this devastating tragedy. If you’re reading AJN on your iPad, you can listen to a podcast interview with the author by tapping on the podcast icon on the first page. You can listen to podcasts from each nurse as well. A special podcast page for this article is also available on our Web site.

Other good reads this month include a special feature on the experiences of nurses during the Fall of Bataan in April, 1942, a Safety Monitor article on transitioning from paper-based to electronic medical records, and a Profile on nurse edge runner Sharon Shindler Rising, who developed a model of care in which women can go through pregnancy together in a facilitated, open group environment.

To see the full table of contents and see what else AJN has to offer this month, visit our Web site.

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2016-11-21T13:05:06+00:00 March 28th, 2014|nursing perspective, nursing research|0 Comments

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Managing editor, American Journal of Nursing

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