AJN in February: Rapid Response Teams, Complications of CHD Repair, Managing Type 2 Diabetes, More

AJN0215 Cover OnlineAJN’s February issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss.

Rapid response teams (RRTs) are teams of expert providers who can be called on in an emergency to treat patients before their condition deteriorates. The success of an RRT depends on whether it is activated properly, a task that often falls to staff nurses. The original research article, “Hospital System Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation: A Cognitive Work Analysis,” describes the factors affecting nurses’ decisions to activate RRTs. This CE feature offers 3 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Further explore this topic by listening to a podcast interview with the author (this and other free podcasts are accessible via the Behind the Article podcasts page on our Web site, in our iPad app, or on iTunes).

Long-term complications after congenital heart defect (CHD) repair. Nurses often encounter patients with complications that occurred years after CHD repair. “Long-Term Outcomes After Repair of Congenital Heart Disease: Part 2” reviews four common CHDs, their repairs, common long-term outcomes, and implications for nurses in both cardiac and noncardiac settings. This article offers 2.5 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Making nurses full partners in reforming health care. The Institute of Medicine’s report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, suggests that nurses should be full partners in reforming health care in this country. “A Bold New Vision for America’s Health Care System” is the first in a series that will revisit the report’s recommendations and the progress that has been made toward making them realities.

Managing diabetes can require patients to engage in a complex daily routine of self-monitoring, medicating, eating healthy, and being physically active. “Better Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Using Paired Testing and Remote Monitoring,” a case study in AJN‘s Diabetes Under Control column, describes a patient who successfully uses self-monitoring techniques and clinician telehealth support to manage diabetes.

There’s plenty more in this issue, including an article honoring the life and legacy of nurse and unsung African American heroine, Charlotte Rhone. See the full table of contents on our Web site.

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2016-11-21T13:03:07+00:00 January 29th, 2015|career, Nursing, nursing perspective|0 Comments

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Managing editor, American Journal of Nursing

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