AJN in August: Oral Histories of African Nurses, Opioid Abuse, Misplaced Enteral Tubes, More

AJN0815.Cover.OnlineOn this month’s cover, a community nurse practices health education with residents of a small fishing village in rural Uganda. Former AJN clinical managing editor Karen Roush took the photo in a small community center made of dried mud bricks, wood, and straw.

According to Roush, nurses wrote the lessons out on poster-sized sheets of white paper and tacked them to the mud wall as they addressed topics like personal hygiene, sanitation, food safety, communication, and prevention of infectious diseases. The reality of nursing in Africa is explored this month in “‘I Am a Nurse’: Oral Histories of African Nurses,” original research that shares African nurse leaders’ stories so we may better understand nursing from their perspective.

Some other articles of note in the August issue:

CE feature: A major source of diverted opioid prescription medications is from friends and family members with legitimate prescriptions.  “Nurses’ Role in Preventing Prescription Opioid Diversion” describes three potential interventions in which nurses play a critical role to help prevent opioid diversion.

From our Safety Monitor column: More than 1.2 million enteral feeding tubes are placed annually in the United States. While the practice is usually safe, serious complications can occur. “Misplacements of Enteral Feeding Tubes Increase After Hospitals Switch Brands,” a report from the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, reviews cases of misplaced tubes and offers guidance for how nurses can prevent such errors in their own practice.

Clinical feature: It is no surprise that physical activity comes with numerous physical and mental benefits, nor that a majority of Americans do not get enough exercise. “The Evolution of Physical Activity Promotion” updates nurses on physical activity guidelines and provides tips for encouraging patients to improve their physical activity. This feature also highlights the importance of decreasing one’s amount of sedentary and sitting time, even in physically active people.

This months Nursing Resources column: Despite the incredible benefits to overall public health that vaccines provide, the public still has concerns over their safety. As nurses are often the ones administering vaccines, they play a central role in teaching patients about vaccine safety and their importance for patients’ own health as well as the health of the public at large. “Vaccine Safety Resources for Nurses” describes how nurses can access the wealth of information from the CDC on vaccine safety.

There’s much more in this month’s issue, including a poignant AJN Reports on caring for patients with perinatal loss. Click here to browse the August issue’s table of contents and explore the issue on our Web site.

Bookmark and Share

About the Author:

Managing editor, American Journal of Nursing

Comments are moderated before approval, but always welcome.