Ongoing Article Series Helps Nurses Write for Publication

Do you have an idea, experience, or knowledge that you feel other nurses can benefit from? Most nurses outside of academia or the policy arena don’t think about writing for publication as something that they should or must do.

But in AJN’s ongoing four-part series, “Writing for Publication: Step By Step,” author Karen Roush, PhD, RN, FNP, highlights the need to make nurses’ voices heard:

Think about all you know and all you do as a nurse. Think about the clinical expertise you bring to your practice, the insights you’ve gained through experience. Think about the problems you solve, improving patient care or creating systems that run more effectively and efficiently. And think about the times you’ve been present at life-defining moments, at moments of suffering and renewal, at beginnings and endings. You carry all of this with you—knowledge and skills, wisdom and insight. It’s time to share it.

In the series, Roush, former clinical managing editor of AJN and an assistant professor at both Lehman College, Bronx, New York, and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, shares her experience and inside knowledge in writing and publishing in practical, easy-to-digest articles that take nurses through the writing process, from start to […]

2017-04-24T09:53:25+00:00 April 24th, 2017|Nursing|0 Comments

Nurses and Patient Safety: Parallel Histories

Photo from AJN archives.

I’m especially pleased that one of the CE articles in the February issue focuses on nursing’s role in creating a safe environment for patients: “Nursing’s Evolving Role in Patient Safety.” And in full disclosure, I was excited to see that the authors used the AJN archives to chronicle how nursing addressed (or didn’t address) safety issues around patient care.

From the earliest days of nursing through to the current complex systems in which we practice, nurses have been the health professionals responsible for ensuring safe passage of patients through the health care system. From Nightingale’s criteria for creating a healing environment to the “5 rights of medication administration,” patients rely on nurses to act as sentinels.

The authors reviewed 1,086 AJN articles from 1900 to 2015 and conducted a content analysis to identify patient safety themes. Aside from uncovering many fascinating (and sometimes alarming!) details of former health care practices, the authors drew this general conclusion:

“Emphasis on patient safety increased as patient care became more complex. As nurses developed a professional identity, they often put a spotlight on safety concerns and solutions.”

Here’s a quote from a nurse who wrote in 1908 about nurses’ duties: […]

2016 Nurse Faculty Scholars/AJN Mentored Writing Award Winner

AJN0916.Cover.OnlineAnd the Winner Is….

We’re pleased to announce that the winner of the 2016 Nurse Faculty Scholars/AJN Mentored Writing Award is Denise M. Eckerlin, BSN, RN, a predoctoral fellow at the University of Washington School of Nursing in Seattle. She won for her CE feature article published in the September issue of AJN,Military Sexual Trauma in Male Service Members.”

Eckerlin coauthored the article with her mentor, Andrea Kovalesky, PhD, RN, an associate professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies at the University of Washington Bothell, and Matthew Jakupcak, PhD, a clinical psychologist and researcher at the Northwest Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center in the VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle. She will receive an award certificate and $500. […]

2016-11-30T17:24:52+00:00 November 21st, 2016|Nursing, nursing students|1 Comment

Hitting the Nursing Conference Trail: Many Miles, But Much to Inspire

“Nurses are doing such interesting and important work.”

A big part of what we do at AJN is seek out the latest information and compelling stories to bring to readers each month. That often means a lot of traveling. While sometimes it does get a bit much (conferences are mostly clustered in the spring and the fall), I’ve come to enjoy traveling—nurses are doing such interesting and important work!

Here’s a recap of some recent travels:

Nursing Research

  • At the October biennial meeting of the Council for the Advancement of Nursing

    Thomas LaVeist Thomas LaVeist, PhD

    Science (CANS), researchers also celebrated the 30th anniversary of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). There’s a full report in the upcoming December issue of AJN, but among the highlights was Thomas LaVeist’s keynote on examining disparities in research. An engaging speaker, he brought his points home with vivid examples of how social status can determine health and well-being—for example, Titanic passengers in third class were 16 times more likely to die than those in first class because of life boat availability. There was also a well-attended session on funding opportunities (both of these presentations are available on the CANS Web site). Of […]

2016-11-21T13:00:52+00:00 November 2nd, 2016|Nursing|0 Comments

AJN in October: Oral Treatments for Breast Cancer, PAD in Older Adults, Research or Not Research, More

The October issue of AJN is now live. Here are some articles we’d like to bring to your attention.

CE Feature: A Review of Common Oral Treatments for Breast Cancer: Improving Patient Safety in Nononcology Settings

According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 3 million women in the United States are currently living with a breast cancer diagnosis. Many seek care in nononcology settings for treatment, acute symptoms and complaints related to their cancer diagnosis, or unrelated concerns. Yet many nononcology providers are unfamiliar with the various oral agents used to treat breast cancer and their possible adverse effects and drug interactions. This article provides an overview of the most common oral treatments for breast cancer and discusses common adverse effects and management.

CE Feature: “Assessing Pain, Agitation, and Delirium in Hospitalized Older Adults

In the acute care setting, pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD) often occur as interrelated parts of a syndrome rather than as separate entities. Because the three facets of PAD may be similar in presentation, it is often difficult for clinicians to recognize the syndrome and to assess and treat it. The challenge is particularly great in older patients. This article provides an overview of each aspect of PAD, discusses clinical considerations related […]

2016-11-21T13:00:54+00:00 October 4th, 2016|Nursing|0 Comments