Posts Tagged ‘Podcast’

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AJN EIC Talks Priorities With Leaders of Critical Care Nurses Organization

May 26, 2015
Karen McQuillan and Teri Lynn Kiss

AACN president-elect Karen McQuillan (left) and president Teri Lynn Kiss

By Shawn Kennedy, AJN editor-in-chief

Last week at the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) annual meeting (see this post), I interviewed the association’s president, Teri Lynn Kiss, or “TK,” and the current president-elect, Karen McQuillan, who will officially take office after this month. After days of rushing from session to session (and there must be 300+ sessions to choose from) and wandering through exhibits, I always enjoy sitting down with leaders of this organization and hearing what they think is important in critical care nursing.

Teri Lynn Kiss, MS, MSSW, RN, CNML, CMSRN, director of Medical Unit-2South and case management services at Alaska-based Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, has led this growing organization of over 104,000 members for the last year. I asked her what she felt she’d accomplished. She said that one of the most valuable things the association had done in the past year was to provide clear and credible information about Ebola to its members, the health care community, and to policy makers in Washington. She also believes the association’s work on creating healthy work environments is important not just for nurses but will translate to better care for patients. Her presidency, she said, enabled her to fulfill her own personal mission of service to others—one she will continue with the association in different capacities.

Karen McQuillan, MS, RN, CNS-BC, CCRN, CNRN, FAAN, a clinical nurse specialist at R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, announced that her theme would be “Courageous Care.” As she noted in her keynote address, “For us as nurses, courageous care means doing what is necessary to provide the best possible care for our patients and their families. Period.”

But you can listen to them speak for themselves in this podcast recording of our conversation.

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Early Localized Prostate Cancer: Nurses Can Help Men Weigh Diagnostic, Treatment Options

March 18, 2015

By Jacob Molyneux, AJN senior editor

A new diagnosis of prostate cancer can be daunting. Nurses play an increasingly important role in helping men and their partners find their way through the maze of available information and choices. One of the two March CE feature articles in AJN, “Early Localized Prostate Cancer,” gives a thorough overview of tests and treatments.

The author, Anne Katz, is a certified sexuality counselor at CancerCare Manitoba, a clinical nurse specialist at the Manitoba Prostate Centre, and a faculty member in the College of Nursing at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, and Athabasca University, Alberta, Canada. She is also the editor of Oncology Nursing Forum. Writes Katz:

. . . as many as 233,000 men in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, 60% of whom are ages 65 or older. Most diagnoses are low grade and localized . . . . Since low-grade, localized prostate cancer is slow growing and rarely lethal, even in the absence of intervention, it can be difficult for men to make treatment decisions after diagnosis—particularly if they do not understand the nuanced pathology results they receive and the potential for treatment to result in long-term adverse effects that can profoundly affect quality of life.

Pros_Cons_PSA_ScreeningThe article discusses options for intervention, potential adverse effects associated with each option, and, crucially, the nurse’s “role in helping men and their partners navigate the challenges of making treatment decisions that are appropriate in their particular circumstances.”

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Color-Coded Wristbands and Patient DNR Status: Can We Do Better?

March 16, 2015

In the Viewpoint column in the March issue of AJN, a staff nurse at an oncology center argues that we can improve our use of color-coded wristbands to communicate patient DNR status. There’s also a short podcast interview with the author below, in which she explains that her motivation for writing this article was “a near-miss” on her unit several years ago.

A lot of attention has been paid lately to the reasons why clinicians don’t follow end-of-life preferences in advance directives. Overaggressive care by some physicians is one reason, as is the vagueness of the language used in advance directives to express treatment preferences.

BlimaMarcus_ViewpointAuthor

Author Blima Marcus

Another major reason advance directives are ignored is lack of immediate access to a patient’s end-of-life preferences at critical moments, such as during a code. This month’s Viewpoint column, “Communicating Patient DNR Status Using Color-Coded Wristbands,” is by Blima Marcus, a doctoral student at the Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing in New York City as well as an RN at the NYU Langone–Perlmutter Cancer Center. Marcus points out that a “patient’s choice of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) status is a major one, and communicating this status in the hospital is often the responsibility of nurses.”

However, she argues, paper and/or electronic chart documentation of patient end-of-life preferences isn’t always adequate, given clinical realities, and can leave “communication gaps that can lead to wrongful resuscitations and mistaken fatalities.” Read the rest of this entry ?

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The Ethics of No-Smokers Hiring Policies: Examining the Assumptions

June 16, 2014
Army nurses light up in 1947. Photo courtesy of Everett Collection / Newscom.

Army nurses light up in 1947. Photo courtesy of Everett Collection / Newscom.

By Jacob Molyneux, senior editor

The Ethical Issues column in the June issue is called “The Ethics of Denying Smokers Employment in Health Care” (free until July 16). As in his previous columns, nurse–ethicist Doug Olsen models the thinking process of an ethicist, illuminating the fundamentals of ethical reasoning even as he tackles a specific ethical question.

Most positions we take on tough questions depend on a number of assumptions, both conscious and otherwise. In this article, Olsen does a great job identifying and then testing the assumptions that underlie such no-smokers hiring policies. Here are the main ones, as Olsen describes them:

  • Personal responsibility applies to smoking—that is, the individual is responsible for the smoking behavior.
  • There is a positive cost–benefit ratio in denying smokers employment.
  • Patient care is improved by not having smokers on staff.
  • Smokers can be reliably identified.
  • Smokers are not being singled out—people with other equally unhealthy behaviors meeting the criteria on this list are treated in the same way.
  • Refusing to employ smokers is good publicity for the hospital and therefore improves the hospital’s ability to fulfill its mission.

After considering the defensibility of each of these assumptions in turn, Olsen makes a distinction between what he calls “restrictive” and “caring” policies, and considers the potential effects of each on public perception when it comes to a hospital. Read the rest of this entry ?

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AJN’s Growing Collection of Podcasts

February 19, 2013
Look for the AJN podcast icon

Look for the AJN podcast icon

A note from AJN’s editor-in-chief, Maureen Shawn Kennedy: Why not head over to our Web site and check out AJN’s podcasts and video collections? Just put your mouse over the MEDIA tab at the top and choose podcasts or one of the video series in the drop-down menu.

We’ve got a variety of podcasts to choose from:

  • monthly highlights, in which editors discuss the articles in each issue
  • “Behind the Article” podcasts are interviews with authors to discuss their work or provide additional context about the article
  • and in “Conversations,” listen to, well, conversations with nurses and other notable and interesting people (there’s even one with former president Jimmy Carter!)

We also have special collections, one of which contains music from Liyana, a group of disabled African singers who graced the cover of the August 2009 issue. (See “On the Cover” from that issue to read about them.)

The other collection contains poems written by nurses who served in the Vietnam War. They were collected by Kay Schwebke, author of “The Vietnam Nurses Memorial: Better Late Than Never” in the May 2009 issue. The short poems are heartbreaking and very much worth hearing.

One final option, if you prefer to save podcasts for listening to at a more convenient time: you can subscribe to AJN‘s podcasts in the iTunes store. Just search for AJN and the podcasts should show up on your screen. Or click this link.

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