Posts Tagged ‘Nursing’

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AJN in February: Rapid Response Teams, Complications of CHD Repair, Managing Type 2 Diabetes, More

January 29, 2015

AJN0215 Cover OnlineAJN’s February issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss.

Rapid response teams (RRTs) are teams of expert providers who can be called on in an emergency to treat patients before their condition deteriorates. The success of an RRT depends on whether it is activated properly, a task that often falls to staff nurses. The original research article, “Hospital System Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation: A Cognitive Work Analysis,” describes the factors affecting nurses’ decisions to activate RRTs. This CE feature offers 3 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Further explore this topic by listening to a podcast interview with the author (this and other free podcasts are accessible via the Behind the Article podcasts page on our Web site, in our iPad app, or on iTunes).

Long-term complications after congenital heart defect (CHD) repair. Nurses often encounter patients with complications that occurred years after CHD repair. “Long-Term Outcomes After Repair of Congenital Heart Disease: Part 2” reviews four common CHDs, their repairs, common long-term outcomes, and implications for nurses in both cardiac and noncardiac settings. This article offers 2.5 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Making nurses full partners in reforming health care. The Institute of Medicine’s report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, suggests that nurses should be full partners in reforming health care in this country. “A Bold New Vision for America’s Health Care System” is the first in a series that will revisit the report’s recommendations and the progress that has been made toward making them realities. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Nursing Perspective: Why I Work in Corrections

January 23, 2015

By Megen Duffy, BA, BSN, RN. Her blog is Not Nurse Ratched.

Michael Coghlan/Flickr

Michael Coghlan/Flickr

When I go to work, I go through a metal detector (did you know Danskos contain metal?), and all my belongings are scanned or gone through. I check out keys and a radio, and then I go through a series of sally ports to get to the medical area. I count every needle and pair of scissors I use. I never see patients without an armed guard nearby, and a good portion of my patients are cuffed and shackled. I’m on camera from the second I get out of my car.

Welcome to prison, nursing style!

“Why?” people ask me. “Couldn’t you get another job? Aren’t you scared? Didn’t you like the ER?” I worked in critical care/emergency nursing for a long time, and yes, I did like it. I brought those skills with me to corrections, where they are a lock-and-key fit. A surprising number of corrections nurses are ex-ER nurses. The same personality types work well in both settings.

Corrections nursing involves phenomenal nursing autonomy and uses many of the skills I honed in the ER:

  • quick triage
  • multitasking
  • sorting out who is lying from who is sick
  • knowing which assessments are the most important for each situation

The atmosphere tends to be quirky to chaotic and requires imagination, flexibility, and an ability to string together solutions to problems that no one has ever seen before. Particularly in jails, you never know what is going to come through the door. A jail booking area is exactly like ER triage.

I like that; I like having a job where strange things are bound to happen. I like seeing things that most people never see. I like knowing that things could get hairy at any time and that I have to be on my game all the time. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Calling All Nurses to Address Health Disparities

January 16, 2015

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is senior adviser for nursing at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and director of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

The author with nursing students at the Rhode Island Nurses Institute Middle College, the first charter school in the country for high school students who want to major in nursing.

The author with nursing students at the Rhode Island Nurses Institute Middle College, the first charter school in the country for high school students who want to major in nursing.

The research on health disparities is stark and continues to increase. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Health Disparities and Inequalities Report–2013 found that mortality rates from chronic illness, premature births, suicide, auto accidents, and drugs were all higher for certain minority populations.

But I believe passionately that nurses and other health professionals can be part of the solution to addressing these disparities. Nurses are privileged to enter into the lives of others in a very intimate way—lives that are often very different than our own.

I understand that it is human nature to be more comfortable with the familiar, but this is not what we are called to in nursing. More than 150 years ago, Florence Nightingale noted a strong link between a population’s health and its economic prosperity, and she called for all people to be treated equally.

My mother told me that when she first entered nurses’ training at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing in 1943, Director Blanche Edwards addressed the students on her conduct expectations for nurse trainees. Part of that lecture—and of the nursing culture absorbed by those being trained at Bellevue—addressed the equality of all human life and how she expected her nurses to treat everyone with equal care and attention. Read the rest of this entry ?

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A Brief Meditation on Love, Loss, and Nursing

January 14, 2015

Julianna Paradisi, RN, OCN, writes a monthly post for this blog and works as an infusion nurse in outpatient oncology.

Manicure, by Julianna Paradisi, 2014

Manicure, by Julianna Paradisi, 2014

As a child, I remember being afraid to fall in love, because I didn’t want to experience the pain of losing people I loved when they died. I don’t know why I thought about this; I only know that I did.

Becoming a nurse has done absolutely nothing to alleviate this fear, but life experience has, to some degree.

Nursing is hard not only because we are there for the dying, but also because we are there for the illnesses and deaths of our own, the people we love, too. Making a living by caring for the sick and dying does not exempt us from personal loss. We grieve and mourn like everyone else.

Recently, I sat in a chair in an emergency department, noticing the sparkly red polish of a woman’s holiday manicure as she rolled past on a gurney. Clearly, she hadn’t anticipated an ER visit as part of her holiday celebrations either. On another gurney, next to my chair, lay my husband, getting an EKG, labs, and IV fluids. The prayer, “Please, don’t let it be a heart attack or a brain tumor,” wove silently through my thoughts.

We were lucky. There was no heart disease, no brain tumor. It was viral, just a touch of the flu. Two liters of IV normal saline did the trick.

“Thank you.”

I wish everything could be cured with a couple of liters of normal saline. There are nurses reading this post who recently grieved for loved ones absent from their places around the holiday meal table. No one mentions that all love stories eventually end. The most enduring conclude at death, and there’s the burn. Nurses know there’s no such thing as love without loss. Read the rest of this entry ?

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AJN in January: Long-Term Complications of CHD Repair, Obesity Interventions, Nurses Planning for Retirement, More

December 29, 2014

AJN0115.Cover.OnlineAJN’s January issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss.

Complications after cardiac repair. Nurses often encounter patients with complications that occurred years after congenital heart defect (CHD) repair. Yet many patients whose CHD was repaired in childhood have not had regular follow-up. Our CE feature, “Long-Term Outcomes After Repair of Congenital Heart Defects: Part 1,” the first in a two-part series, reviews six congenital heart defects, their repairs, and common long-term outcomes, as well as implications for nurses in both cardiac and noncardiac settings. This CE feature offers 2.5 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

To further explore the topic, listen to a podcast interview with the author (this and other free podcasts are accessible via the Behind the Article podcasts page on our Web site, in our iPad app, or on iTunes). A video of an atrial septal defect device placement is also available in the iPad edition of this article.

Obesity interventions. Patients with obesity often face stigma and bias, even from the nurses who care for them. “The Obesity Epidemic, Part 2: Nursing Assessment and Intervention,” the second article in a two-part series, presents a theoretical framework to guide nursing assessment of patients with obesity and their families and reviews the most common lifestyle, pharmacologic, and surgical interventions. This CE feature offers 2.5 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Are you ready for retirement? Nurses might be retiring later than ever, but are they planning for it? “Preparing for Retirement in Uncertain Times” shows nurses how to optimize their future financial security before leaving the workforce.

Essentials for clinical instructors.Fostering Clinical Reasoning in Nursing Students,” the third article in our Teaching for Practice series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, describes the importance of developing clinical reasoning skills and how instructors can help students learn them. Read the rest of this entry ?

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A Lasting Gift for a Nurse’s Holiday Shifts and Lost Family Time

December 19, 2014
Illustration by Lisa Dietrich for AJN.

Illustration by Lisa Dietrich for AJN.

As we know, gifts come in many forms, and often are as valuable to the giver as to the receiver. The best ones come at times when we least expect them. Readers will find that the start of AJN‘s December Reflections essay, “A Change of Heart,” describes a frustration that may be familiar to many nurses. In this case, it’s Christmas Day, and a nurse is kept by the urgent demands of her job from spending time with family. She writes:

I’ve been a nurse for more than half of my life . . . I love my career and consider myself blessed to have found my calling. But we all experience times when our long hours and the rigorous demands of this job make us feel that we sacrifice too much of our personal and family time to care for strangers.

The author had planned to be home for Christmas dinner. But, she tells us, “we had four back-to-back emergency CABGs starting at 8 am and stretching long past my scheduled 3 pm end of shift.” The essay develops from there as the hours pass. And then we meet a patient with everything at stake. The author is not the only one in danger of missing Christmas with family, and not just this year but for all the years to come.

We are reminded again and again that nursing has its truly redeeming moments of connection, those reminders that the work you do can be the difference between life and death for a patient. So it happens in this short, engaging essay. We encourage you to click the article title above and give it a read. It’s free, and it might put the various challenges of the holidays into perspective.—Jacob Molyneux, senior editor/blog editor 

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Too Tired to Nurse

December 8, 2014

By Shawn Kennedy, AJN editor-in-chief

by patchy patch, via flickr

by patchy patch, via flickr

Just about every nurse I know has been “asked” (or “guilted” or “mandated”) to work an additional shift on top of a grueling one. The worst such experience I ever had was having to work from midnight to 8 am after working a straight week of 4 pm to midnight shifts. I was exhausted, but someone had called in sick, leaving only two RNs and one aide for the 11-bed ED trauma unit.

I was so tired that at one point I found myself falling asleep while I was standing by a patient’s bed charting vital signs. I couldn’t remember the blood pressure reading I had obtained just moments before. It was good luck that I didn’t make an error—and had the good sense to have a colleague double-check medications I was readying (these were the old days, before unit dosing). Read the rest of this entry ?

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