Posts Tagged ‘Nurses’

h1

AJN in November: Palliative Care, Mild TBI, the Ethics of Force-Feeding Prisoners, More

October 31, 2014

AJN1114.Cover.OnlineAJN’s November issue is now available on our Web site. Here’s a selection of what not to miss.

Palliative care versus hospice. For many seriously ill, hospitalized older adults, early implementation of palliative care is critical. These patients often require medically and ethically complex treatment decisions. This month’s original research article, “Staff Nurses’ Perceptions Regarding Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults,” found that staff nurses often confuse palliative and hospice care, a fact that suggests a need for increased understanding and knowledge in this area. This CE feature offers 2.5 CE credits to those who take the test that follows the article.

Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have profoundly negative effects on quality of life and can negatively affect relationships with family and caretakers. This issue’s other CE feature, “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury,” reviews the most commonly reported signs and symp­toms of mild TBI, explores the condition’s effects on both patient and family, and provides direction for devel­oping nursing interventions that promote patient and family adjustment. Earn 2 CE credits by taking the test that follows the article. To further explore the topic, listen to a podcast interview with the author (this and other podcasts are accessible via the Behind the Article page on our Web site or, in our iPad app, by tapping the icon on the first page of the article).

Medication safety. While preparing medications in complex health care environments, nurses are frequently distracted or interrupted, which can lead to medication errors. “Implementing Evidence-Based Medication Safety Interventions on a Progressive Care Unit,” an article in our Cultivating Quality column, describes how nursing staff at one facility implemented five medication safety interventions designed to decrease distractions and interruptions during medication preparation. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Ebola: A Role for Nurses in Sharing the Facts

October 29, 2014

By Shawn Kennedy, AJN editor-in-chief

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 12.27.27 PMThe current Ebola crisis has everyone concerned over transmission, and rightly so. The public has been in a quandary as to who and what to believe. I can’t say I blame them. We should have been better prepared and anticipated that, given the situation in West Africa, we would eventually see a patient with Ebola present to a U.S. hospital ED (or clinic or urgent care center). What’s surprising is that it didn’t happen sooner.

I’d thought fears about widespread transmission of Ebola had abated after no more new cases arose from that of Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas: his family, who were in the apartment with him during the time he was sick, did not contract Ebola and have since been released from quarantine; the two nurses who became ill treating Duncan have now been declared Ebola free and none of their contacts have become ill; no other nurses who provided care for him have fallen ill.

But with the onset of confirmed Ebola in a New York physician who had recently returned from caring for Ebola victims in West Africa, fears of widespread contagion resurfaced. Craig Spencer had been self-monitoring his symptoms while he went about his life; when he began to feel ill and developed a low-grade fever, he initiated a controlled transport in isolation to Bellevue Hospital.

And when nurse Kaci Hickox returned from volunteering in West Africa, she was caught in New Jersey’s new Ebola precautions and placed in mandatory quarantine in a tent outside a hospital in Newark. She protested, secured attorneys to advocate on her behalf (basing her protest on CDC recommendations that routine quarantine of nonsymptomatic health care workers is not justified), and was released to travel home to Maine, where she is now disputing Maine’s mandatory in-home quarantine and active monitoring requirement in favor of self-monitoring. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Fear of Infection, Getting Job Done: Not New to Nurses

October 27, 2014

Quarantine, isolation: medical terms heavy with accreted meanings (psychological, metaphorical). Terms we’ve been hearing a lot lately, as in the case of nurse Kaci Hickox, quarantined in a tent in New Jersey after her return from treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, released today after days of public controversy.

These words have vivid histories. Epidemics of polio, influenza, and other illnesses took many lives in the U.S. during the 20th century. And nurses were always there, taking risks, applying the latest knowledge to control or cure. In the April 1940 edition of the American Journal of Nursing, a nurse wrote a short but evocative essay about her own fears of entering an isolation room to treat a child with an unnamed condition, perhaps measles or scarlet fever. Here’s a snippet.

Germs

(One wonders if she had been given the recommended personal protective equipment of the time for such infections . . .)

To read the article, free until December 1, click this link and then click through to the PDF version in the upper-right corner of the landing page.—Jacob Molyneux, senior editor

Bookmark and Share

h1

Addressing Nurses’ Urgent Concerns About Ebola and Protective Equipment

October 15, 2014

By Betsy Todd, MPH, RN, CIC, AJN clinical editor. (See also her earlier post, “Ebola: A Nurse Epidemiologist Puts the Outbreak in Perspective.”)

This is not a time to panic. It is a time to get things right.—John Nichols, blogging for the Nation, 10/12/2014

Scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles budding from an infected VERO E6 cell (35,000x magnification). Credit: NIAID

Scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles budding from an infected VERO E6 cell (35,000x magnification). Credit: NIAID

For years, nurses have tolerated increasingly cheap, poorly made protective gear—one result of health care’s “race to the bottom” cost-cutting. Now the safety of personal protective equipment (PPE) is being hotly debated as the Ebola epidemic spills over into the U.S.

If all nurses had access to impermeable gowns that extended well below the knee (and could be securely closed in back, had real cuffs, and didn’t tear easily); faceguards that completely shielded; N95 respirator masks that could be properly molded to the face; and disposable leg and shoe covers, we might not be having the same conversation. Yet how much protection can we count on from the garb we now have available, especially considering the minimal donning and doffing training given to most nurses?

While there is more to be learned about possible “outlier” modes of Ebola transmission, it’s pretty clear from past experience (including recent Ebola hospitalizations at Emory University Hospital and the University of Nebraska Medical Center, where no transmission has occurred) that standard, contact, and droplet precautions will virtually always prevent Ebola virus transmission. Because of the theoretical possibility that the virus could be aerosolized during procedures like intubation or suctioning, airborne precautions are usually added. (And from what we’ve seen, they’re being followed routinely, and not used only during aerosolizing procedures.)

Many organizations, including National Nurses United, are calling for hazmat-type gear and PAPR hoods (powered air-purifying respirators, which are HEPA-filtered) for staff who care for Ebola patients. Because most nurses have not used these, this more complex gear presents new challenges, especially because of the potential for self-contamination when worn and removed by untrained staff.

Specific techniques for donning and doffing PPE are not new, but many nurses have never been taught to pay attention to these details. One has only to look at staff in a contact precautions room, only half covered by their untied gowns, to understand why resistant organisms continue to spread within hospitals. Many clinicians may not have believed that their cavalier attitude towards PPE had anything to do with the next patient’s nosocomial MRSA pneumonia. During this Ebola epidemic, though, we are quickly learning that the proper use of PPE is a matter of life and death—ours. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

If You Want to Write, Do It (and Skip the ‘Weaseling Qualifiers’)

September 26, 2014
Photo by mezone, via Flickr.

Photo by mezone, via Flickr.

Are you one of those people—nurse or otherwise—who daydreams about writing (a personal essay about a formative experience, an article about a quality improvement project you took part in, a blog post about some aspect of nursing) but can’t seem to find the proper way to get started?

Since the weekend is coming and the October issue of AJN is now live on our Web site, it seems a good time to draw attention to “On Writing: Just Do It,” the editorial by Shawn Kennedy, AJN‘s editor-in-chief. Kennedy points out the one idea common to most writing advice: you have to start somewhere. You have to do it, and learn from doing it, and then keep doing it. Or, as she puts it:

One key to becoming a good writer—or a good anything—is persistence.

But the editorial also gives a range of other excellent tips from Kennedy and several experts in the field, and quotes writing advice found in AJN issues through the decades. My favorite bit is from a 1977 editorial by former AJN editor Thelma Schorr:

“[the writer] will use the active voice and not shirk his [or her] responsibility by introducing a statement with such weaseling qualifiers as ‘It is considered that…’ or ‘It is generally believed that…’”

What a great word: “weaseling.” It’s about as far as you can get from the jargon that afflicts so much academic writing. So if you’ve got some free time this weekend, take 15 minutes and see what happens. Netflix will wait.—Jacob Molyneux, senior editor

 

h1

Ebola: Infection Control Resources Make All the Difference

September 16, 2014

This post is follow-up to our widely shared post (“Ebola: A Nurse Epidemiologist Puts the Outbreak in Perspective”) by AJN clinical editor Betsy Todd. The author, Amanda Anderson, is a critical care nurse and graduate student in New York City who is currently doing a graduate placement at AJN two days a week. Her last post for this blog is here.

Ebola virus viron

By CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. CDC image library.

I don’t know a single nurse who likes caring for multiple isolation patients. The process of donning a new gown, pair of gloves, and mask each time you enter an isolated patient’s room is arduous and time-consuming. Personal protective equipment (PPE) clogs the garbage cans and can be hot and confining.

PPE has been in the news quite a bit lately because of Ebola. An interview with Liberian nurses by Hunter College’s Diana Mason on her WBAI radio show Healthstyles revealed that the Liberian Ministry of Health estimates 75% of virus victims are women—mostly nurses and caregivers. Nurses in West Africa might really love some of those pesky yellow isolation gowns.

Ebola can be a messy virus. Infected people have copious diarrhea and vomiting, often containing blood. The basics of care for Ebola patients should not be new to us; HIV and hepatitis can be spread in many of the same ways. We’ve got little to fear if we follow CDC guidelines for PPE and infection control. But in parts of Africa, where supplies we take for granted are scant, nurses and caregivers can’t even hold the hand of a dying patient or family member, much less clean them, without fearing for their lives.

As Mason’s interview reveals, many nurses are assigned 25 or more patients each shift in hospitals that lack electricity, running water, and gloves. (In an article for Buzzfeed, Jina Moore describes a nurse working in an Ebola ward who wears the isolation kit sent to her by the Liberian Ministry of Health. The kit includes a shower cap, gloves, and rubber bands for her wrists. Her ankles and neck are exposed, peeking out from her own short scrubs.) Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Enterovirus D68: Precautions, Surveillance, Yes; Alarm, No

September 15, 2014

By Betsy Todd, MPH, RN, CIC, AJN clinical editor

EV68-infographicAs news coverage focuses on the latest clusters of suspected—and, in some instances, confirmed—cases of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) as they occur in successive regions of the U.S., here’s a quick primer on what is known about EV-D68.

Is this a new, dangerous virus?
EV-D68, a non-polio enterovirus, is not a “novel” virus—the term used to describe emerging infections such as SARS and MERS. It’s more accurate to describe it as the CDC does: it is an “increasingly recognized” cause of respiratory infections, especially in children.

EV-D68 was first isolated in 1962. While reports of EV-D68 since then have been sporadic, the CDC in 2011 reported on clusters of this viral infection in Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Arizona as well as in Asia and Europe. It’s likely that there are hundreds or even thousands of EV-D68 infections every year in the U.S. But as with many other viral infections, they will range in severity, and an infection that looks like “a cold” isn’t usually brought to the attention of a health care provider.

According to the CDC, most enterovirus infections are actually asymptomatic; this may be the case with EV-D68 as well.

Diagnostic testing for EV-D68 involves RT-PCR and gene sequencing. Most hospital labs therefore are unable to test for it. Some readily available diagnostic tests do identify “enterovirus” but don’t type the virus further; some tests misidentify EV-D68 as a rhinovirus. (Specimens from suspect cases in the U.S. therefore almost always are handled by CDC labs.)

Because treatment is symptomatic, the lack of a widely available test for EV-D68 is not an issue for the patient. But as more sensitive and specific tests become more widely available, more cases will be correctly identified, and we can learn more about the course of the disease.

Genetically similar to cause of common cold.
EV-D68 belongs to a genus of viruses that includes polioviruses, rhinoviruses, coxsackieviruses, and echoviruses. It is not “polio-like.” Biologically and epidemiologically, it is most similar to human rhinoviruses, which cause the common cold.

Severe respiratory infections in children? Visitor restrictions?
While we are seeing reports of severe respiratory illness in patients with suspected or confirmed EV-D68, it should be noted, as the CDC points out, that many/most of those hospitalized with this and other respiratory infections are people with chronic conditions such as asthma or other health issues. Visitor restriction is a routine response in any hospital when there is a cluster of respiratory infections in the community. Read the rest of this entry ?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 980 other followers

%d bloggers like this: