Posts Tagged ‘Medicaid’

h1

One Is the Loneliest Number

September 13, 2013

By Shawn Kennedy, AJN editor-in-chief

The great Bartholdi statue, liberty enlightening the world: the gift of France to the American people.  Speculative depiction published the year before the statue was erected. In this depiction the statue faces south; it actually faces east/Wikimedia Commons

The Bartholdi statue, liberty enlightening the world: the gift of France to the American people. Speculative depiction published the year before the statue was erected. In this depiction the statue faces south; it actually faces east/Wikimedia Commons

I’ve been struck recently by how the United States sometimes seems to stand apart from other nations. This is sometimes called “American exceptionalism.”

The most obvious example of this is the recent push—temporarily put on hold due to the emergence of negotiations about the possible handover of Syrian chemical weapons to Russia—to garner support among other nations for a military strike against the Syrian government in response to its use of chemical weapons against its own people.

By now, most of us have seen the graphic videos on media outlets and they are indeed disturbing. There are signs of neurotoxicity in some of the victims: rigid posturing, seizures, and foaming at the mouth. According to news reports, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says the evidence is “undeniable” and it deserves a harsh response. While several other countries and alliances have issued statements condemning the use of chemical weapons, thus far, other than France, none have come forward to agree to military action; there seems to be little likelihood of action by the United Nations (UN).

It may well be a case of apples and oranges, but another example of how the United States stands alone in comparison to other developed countries is in our approach to health care. The passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and then the Supreme Court’s upholding of its individual mandate provision, made me think this country would at last join most of the other developed nations of the world in providing for the health of its people.

But how naive I was! The resistance by opponents of the law has now moved to the states, many of which have refused to expand Medicaid or institute the insurance exchanges that are essential to providing health coverage for those currently without it and who must obtain it to meet the individual mandate. According to Kaiser Health News, a number of states are offering insurance exchanges or marketplaces where consumers not covered by employer-provided insurance can “shop” for low-cost plans and plans that fit individual health care needs and budgets (according to one report, a Minnesota resident can purchase a plan for under $100 a month). In those states which declined to set up exchanges, a federal plan will be available. Enrollment in the exchanges is set to begin October 1. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

The Affordable Care Act on Trial

March 16, 2012

By Maureen Shawn Kennedy, MA, RN, editor-in-chief

Courtesy of Kaiser Health News

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 47 states have enacted some legislation to block or limit various requirements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). And a week from Monday, on March 26, the Supreme Court will begin hearings on the constitutionality of the law, as 26 states bring suit against the federal government. The primary issue for the Court: can the federal government mandate that individuals must purchase health insurance?

Other closely related issues the court has also set aside time to consider are whether other provisions of the law can still be implemented or must be voided if the individual mandate is struck down, the legality of the proposed Medicaid expansion, and whether the court must in fact wait until the individual mandate is actually implemented in 2015 before even considering its legality.

So how do many Americans feel? The Kaiser Family Foundation has been tracking opinions on the law and offers an excellent interactive chart that shows opinions according to different variables, including age, income, political party affiliation, gender, and current insurance status. Their findings may surprise you.

For more information about the Affordable Care Act and it implications for nursing, here are some links to AJN’s coverage since it was signed into law in 2010:

“Nurses and the Affordable Care Act,” Mary Wakefield
“What Future for the Affordable Care Act,” Diana Mason
“Health Care Reform and a System in Flux,” Jacob Molyneux

 Bookmark and Share

h1

Supporting Nurse Practitioners as ‘Priority Primary Care Practitioners’

July 29, 2010

By Susan McBride, PhD, RN, professor at Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Nursing 

It’s important for nurses to understand the Medicare and Medicaid incentives to implement electronic health records (EMRs) and to move to their “meaningful use,” as well as the purpose of the Regional Extension Centers created to support nurse practitioners and other “priority primary care providers” in the implementation process.

Dr. Mari Tietze, John Delaney, and I are fortunate to be involved in two of the Regional Extension Centers in Texas. We believe that nursing professionals have many contributions to make in the evolving electronic highway in the U.S. We will blog later about our roles as nursing informaticists in the Regional Extension Center program.

What are ‘Regional Extension Centers’? Under the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) Health Information Technology Initiative to support getting providers to meaningful use on electronic health records, the ONC has established Regional Extension Centers. There are 60 Regional Extension Centers that will furnish assistance to providers in specific geographic services areas covering virtually all of the U.S. A total of $643 million is devoted to these centers.

The purpose of the Regional Extension Centers is to support priority primary care practitioners in priority settings to implement and use EMRs according to the meaningful use requirements outlined in our previous post (below is a screenshot illustrating one example of how an EMR might align with meaningful use requirements; click image to enlarge). The goal of the program is to provide federally subsidized outreach and support services to over 100,000 priority primary care practitioners within the next two years. 

© 2010 e-MDs, Inc. All rights reserved. Product and company names are trademarks or trade names of their respective corporations.

Regional Extension Centers will provide the following support services to providers:

  • EHR implementation
  • education and training
  • project management
  • incentives
  • meaningful use

NPs as “priority primary care practitioners.” A priority primary care practitioner is defined by the ONC as a primary care provider  that is any doctor of medicine or osteopathy, any nurse practitioner, nurse midwife, or physician assistant with prescriptive privileges in the locality where she or he practices, who is actively practicing in one of the following specialties: family, internal, pediatric, or obstetrics and gynecology.

Priority settings. Many NPs work within priority settings identified by the ONC, including small group practices of 10 or fewer, public and critical access hospitals, federally qualified health care clinics, rural healthcare clinics, and other settings serving uninsured, underinsured, and medically underserved populations.

NPs are eligible for support services of the Regional Extension Centers. For more information on what services might be available to you, contact the Regional Extension Center within your geographic region. A table and map covering the 60 centers is available here.

Incentives program for EMR implementation. February 17, 2009, President Obama signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and along with that Act $33 billion dedicated to Medicare and Medicaid incentives for providers and hospitals who adopt, implement, or upgrade an EMR system and meaningfully use that system. As we blogged previously, meaningful use of EMRs has many parameters that providers must meet—but with that comes financial incentives that eligible providers can receive.

Bookmark and Share

For Those Interested In Learning More, See Below….

Read the rest of this entry ?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 937 other followers

%d bloggers like this: